Posted by & filed under Opinion.

The Scobleizer weighed in on Randy Bias’s opinion that Openstack should adopt Amazon’s AWS API.

So who get’s the cloud right – Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Openstack, ect…?

I’ve used AWS quite a bit. I have a project in production on Google App Engine. I keep up on Azure. Which do I like best? Hands down, without a doubt Parse.com.

When I first learned about Parse.com I thought I didn’t need it. I know the server side. I can play the IIS or Apache admin role. I may not know every nook and cranny of those technologies but I can get a website up. I can setup a database server and connect it to a website. I can even program the server side, Python, C#, NodeJs, you name it. I thought to myself, “I’m the man. I just got auto updating in NHibernate working and I can spin up AWS servers from the command line. So why do I want Parse.com?”

My boss, however saw the potential of Parse.com right away and so down that road I went. I work for a software development firm, Red Shed Technology, and we build mobile and web apps. He saw that not managing servers is a major benefit for us.

Of all the major cloud providers, Google App Engine comes closest to parse. With GAE you do not need to worry about servers. You do, however, need to write a lot more code to get your solution up.

So what makes Parse.com special? Well besides always needing to type “Parse.com” in any google search because the word “parse” is too broad? It is dead simple and covers a large percentage of use cases. With Parse.com and a good client side SPA like AngularJS I can build web apps or mobile apps with phone gap and never need to spin up a server or setup a database. What’s more I get an app framework on the server that includes user registration, password management, login and roles. I get a framework for tracking mobile installations. I get push messaging to mobile.

Parse.com’s original mission was to create a backend service for mobile developers that needed backend functionality but had no server side experience. They did an amazing job and Facebook’s acquisition of them shows that. Facebook is now a cloud provider, and one with a big upside.

I used to work for a Fortune 500 company who could learn a lot from how Parse.com supports developers and gives them the backend tools to build a large variety of apps, the data for which is on a common platform and under centralized control. Just the centralized user account management would probably save them millions. I mean really, imagine the potential.

Scoble talks about innovation. So how can Openstack innovate, or AWS or Azure or Google? Make it dead simple for companies to give their developers the Parse.com API or something similar (plenty of room to innovate here) in a cloud environment that they can control.

I’ve had experience working inside two enterprise level environments and they both desperately needed this solution. Millions are wasted because developers are solving too many problems and solving the same problems over and over.

As for me, I’ve said goodbye to the server, fell in love with Javascript, traded my PC for a Mac, Visual Studio for WebStorm and life is good :).